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Iris

My grandparents often referred to the Bearded Iris as the King of the Garden. As a child I remember their magnificent gardens brimming with these breathtaking beauties. They are without doubt one of the most spectacular sights in any garden during the months of April and May. Iris range in size from tiny alpines to the enormous four foot tall species which bloom with three upright petals, three downward petals referred to as falls and beards which are located at the top of downward petals.

Bearded Iris

There are two types of Iris. Rhizome Irises spread horizontally by way of thick stems. The huge Irises belong in this group. They are showy, tall, magnificent and the type of plant I strongly recommend you plant in your garden. The other type is bulbs which produce smaller Irises. The bulbs are divided into three groups; Reticulata, Juno and Xiphium. The Reticulata group produces Irises which attain a height of approximately six inches. The Juno Group produces Iris blooms which attain a height of approximately one foot. The Xiphium group has flat leaves and the Iris attains a height of approximately two feet.

Bearded Iris

Although each plant is lovely I would prefer to focus on the bearded Iris. Bearded Irises require well drained soil and a sunny location which receives at least six hours of direct sun per day. The Bearded Iris should be divided every four years. Dig up clumps of the plant and transplant to another garden. This task should be performed in late July or early August. Another option is dividing the plant in spring however you will attain fewer blooms. Do not divide too late in the fall as the onslaught of winter may kill the plant.

Iris

Try to fertilize your Irises in spring and again in June. Irises will grow sufficiently with spring rainfall therefore watering is not required. Let the leaves die back naturally as the plant requires nutrients from the leaves for the upcoming year.

Bearded Iris has six classifications. Miniature Dwarf Bearded Iris attains a height of approximately eight inches. Standard Dwarf Bearded Iris attains a height of approximately sixteen inches. Intermediate Bearded Iris attains a height of approximately two feet. Border Bearded Iris attains a height of approximately two feet. Miniature Tall Bearded Iris attains a height of approximately two feet. Tall Bearded Iris attains a height of approximately two feet and over. I suggest the Tall Bearded Iris for your garden as the height can reach four feet and the impact of this specimen is unparalleled.

Iris

Some gardeners prepare an entire bed devoted to Irises although a larger gardening area is required for this luxury. Plant Bearded Iris this spring. Your Bearded Iris will garner countless compliments. Bearded Iris offers almost every color of the rainbow, grow majestically in your garden, achieve enormous bloom size and secure their position as the star of the spring garden.

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